Austin won’t ignore Ann Richards School and People’s Community Clinic

It’s impossible to ignore how composed and accomplished they are.

The students from the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders are the real celebrities during the annual Reach for the Stars benefit for the Ann Richards School Foundation, now held at Four Seasons Hotel Austin.

Teacher Anah Wiersema with students Haley Loan and Julie Apagya Bonney at the fabulous Reach for the Stars gala for the Ann Richards School Foundation. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

They speak with such assurance and wisdom. They are headed to top colleges all over the country. Many are the first in their families to do so.

Julie Apagya Bonney and Ebheni Henderson led the charge before we saw a video interview with Girl Scouts national leader — and former Austinite — Sylvia Acevedo conducted by Maddy Schell and Maggie Saucedo. As if to trump that, young journalist Haley Lone interviewed Oprah pal Gayle King on the set of her TV show.

We throughly enjoyed our conversations at a table front-and-center sponsored by Ellen Richards, the late governor’s daughter who doesn’t have a new book out. (We talked mostly birds and nature.) Then we heard from more Class of ’18 — Eleanor Bailey and Maria Cruz, before Becky Alonso and Gus Flores introduced the winner of the Ann Richards Legacy Award, who happened to be super-sharp former principal Jeanne Goka.

Sorry guys, but I’d trade her for any principal from my past.

I barely glimpsed Ann Richards writer/actor Holland Taylor before slipping out during the “pompoms up” funding round.

My only private concern: Is anyone doing this sort of things for the Bertha Sadler Means Young Women’s Leadership Academy across town? We’ll ask around.

People’s Community Clinic

Anyone who thinks that repasts such as There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch are merely light social duties has not been to this fundraiser for People’s Community Clinic now held at the Four Seasons Hotel Austin.

Regina Willis, Mitali Kapadia and Haley Aldrich at Tjere’s No Such Thing As Free Lunch for People’s Community Clinic. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

Surrounded by folks at our Becky Beaver-led set of tables such as Nancy ScanlanMelissa Miller and Nancy Inman would have been intellectually exhilarating enough. But then we heard from clinic CEO Regina Rogoff, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Louis Appel and longtime board member Dr. Nona Niland, all of whom could easily hold my studious attention.

Niland introduced Philip S. Dial, reluctant winner of the W. Neal Kocurek Award, named for the strategist behind much of the city’s enlightened civic health. Despite his reluctance to take the limelight, financial expert Dial made a fine speaker and reminded us that the quiet money aces often make a nonprofit grow and thrive, as he has done for People’s.

The meat of the lunch, so to speak, was a public conversation between Texas Tribune CEO Evan Smith and Dr. Karen DeSalvo, former acting assistant secretary for health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and now at the University of Texas Dell School of Medicine.

DeSalvo was head of the health department in New Orleans during the Hurricane Katrina crisis and learned much about decentralizing health care and going “upstream” to encourage health before care is needed through community clinics. She believes we need to get past debates on coverage — everybody should be — to talk more about how to save money and lives through community solutions, including a “blue-cities-in-red-states” ones, like the grand experiment going on in Austin right now.

She’s a firecracker and I’d love to profile her for this publication.

 

 

What caused all the excitement at Austin nonprofit pitch fest

I would have given each group $100,000. No, make that $1 million.

At the LBJ Auditorium, reps from each of seven nonprofits made their cases for three minutes at Philanthropitch, then followed up with three minutes of answers to questions from six judges, all successful entrepreneurs.

Chelsea Elliott of the Half Helen Foundation and Kevin Iraheta of the Global Good Fund at Philanthropitch Austin. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

That’s it. No stacks of paperwork. No hours of pleasing donors.

Just pure, compact rhetorical power. And oh yes, a good cause. And a plan that includes growth and internal sustainability. This is how the celebrity judges split up the money:

– Half Helen Foundation: $64,100
– Thinkery: $38,210
– Code2College: $35,553
– College Forward: $18,913
– Generation Citizen: $11,722
– VentureLab: $7,052

But wait, there’s more.

“There was this amazing moment in the judges’ deliberation room where Kendra Scott asked if she could announce two internship placements for Code2College (which coaches nontraditional students to code) and the answer was obviously, YES!” reports Dan Graham, CEO of BuildASign.com cofounder of Notley, the group behind Philanthropitch, which has spread across the country and to the U.K.. “Immediately Gay Gaddis from T3, Jag Bath from Favor and Mellie Price from the Dell Medical School also committed to two internships each!”

CODE2COLLEGE: How to make any student ready for tech career.

On stage, as the the winners received big checks, Lisa Graham announced “Oh and Mr. Stephenson, we have another announcement for you” and proceeded to announce all the internships, which give Code2College added credibility and sustainability.

“As Lisa was finishing, Matt Stephenson (founder of Code2College) began running around hugging the judges and that’s when a woman starting sprinting up the aisle,” Dan recalls. “It was Amy Averett with Alamo Drafthouse announcing that they, too, were committing to two internships! That’s a total of 10 internships.”

 I love Austin.

Meet 5 Austin Women of Distinction, 2 Young Masters

Each year, the Girls Scouts of Central Texas judiciously selects a small group of leaders to honor as Women of Distinction. They are saluted at a brisk, dignified luncheon, this year set for noon on April 26 at the AT&T Center. I always learn a lot at this event.

RELATED: Two dozen Austin parties you don’t want to miss.

Alexis Jones, founder of I Am That Girl. Contributed by Oprah.com

Alexis Jones (Rising Star Award) is the founder of nationally recognized organizations I Am That Girl and ProtectHer. She’s an author and motivational speaker for Generation Y, and named one of AOL’s Makers alongside Oprah Winfrey and Hillary Clinton.

Nora Comstock, Ph.D., is an entrepreneur and business leader, founder of Comstock Connections and national and international founder of Las Comadres Para Las Americas, current member of Austin Community College District Board of Trustees, and member of the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame.

Denise Davis, J.D, is the founding partner of Davis Kaufmann PLLC, lobbyist and former Texas House of Representatives deputy parliamentarian, advisor and attorney to two Texas Lt. Governors, and chief of staff for Texas House of Representative Speaker Joe Straus.

Laura Wolf, J.D, is executive director for CASA of Travis County Inc. She developed merger between Austin Rape Crisis Center and Center for Battered Women to create SafePlace, served as former President of the Austin Junior League, and is recipient of two national awards from CASA Inc.

Amy Shaw Thomas, J.D, is vice chancellor of academic and health affairs and an executive Oofficer at the University of Texas System, board member of Downtown Austin Alliance and Texas Methodist Foundation, active member of Austin Area Research Organization, and advocate for inclusion, diversity and meritocracy.

Young Masters

Described as a rock star of the classical violin (which might explain this rather wacky publicity pose), Austinite Charles Yang was a 2004 recipient of the Young Master award from Texas Cultural Trust. Contributed

Texas Cultural Trust, an arts advocacy group, has chosen 15 students for the 2018 class of Young Masters. Each of the promising artists receive a $10,000 scholarship over the course of two years to enhance their studies.

RELATED: Heidi Marquez Smith takes over at Texas Cultural Trust

Two are from our fair city: Ian Stripling Jenson, an 11th grader at McCallum Fine Arts Academy, has been selected in the music category for violin, and Leif Tilton, a ninthe grader at Bowie High School, has been selected in the music category for classical guitar.

Some of the past Young Masters recipients have gone on to glory, including Austinite Charles Yang, a 2004 honoree. The Boston Globe judged that this rising soloist “plays classical violin with the charisma of a rock star.” He also happens to play guitar.

Austin parties we love: Early 2018

After a holiday break, the Austin social scene warms up rapidly. Peek at some parties we eagerly anticipate.

Jan. 27: Opening night of Austin Opera’s “Ariadne auf Naxos.” Long Center.

Jan. 27: Dell Children’s Gala. Austin Convention Center.

Jan. 27: Human Rights Campaign Austin Gala. JW Marriott.

Jan. 31: Promise to Children Award Luncheon for Camp Fire Central Texas. St. David’s Episcopal Church.

Feb. 2: Angelina Eberly Luncheon for Austin History Center Association. Driskill Hotel.

Feb. 3: Rodeo Austin Gala with Jack Ingram, Bruce Robison and Charlie Robison. Palmer Events Center.

Feb. 3: Casablanca for CASA of Travis County. JW Marriott.

Feb. 3: Corazón Awards for Con Mi Madre. After-party with Bidi Bidi Band. Brazos Hall.

Feb. 3: Puppy Bowl for Austin Humane Society. 124 W. Anderson Lane.

Feb. 3: Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner for Project Transitions. The Thinkery and other venues.

Feb. 10: Winemaker Valentine Luncheon. Fall Creek Vineyards.

Feb. 10: Carnaval Brasileiro. Palmer Events Center.

Feb. 11: The Nobelity Project’s Feed the Peace Awards. Four Seasons Hotel.

Feb. 11: Women’s Symphony League presents Red Haute Valentine Party. Omni Barton Creek Resort.

Feb. 12: Austin Blues Revue and mixer. Antone’s Nightclub.

Feb. 15: Rockin’ Round Up for Any Baby Can. ACL Live.

 

Sneak peek: Con Mi Madre’s big-hearted Corazón Awards

We’ve made no secret of our admiration for Teresa Granillo and her group, Con Mi Madre, which guides Latinas and their mothers through the educational system. They are setting up a national model with their record of what works and what does not.
Well, the group’s big annual benefit, the Corazón Awards, comes up soon Feb. 3 at Brazos Hall.
The 2017 Con Mi Madre’s Corazón Awards and Gala at Brazos Hall. Contributed
Here’s a sneak peek at the 2018 honorees.
Con Mi Madre Award

Judith Loredo

Corazón Award

Congressman Lloyd Doggett

Mariposa Awards

Austin Independent School District

The Colmenero Family

Google

Sandy Segura Alcalá

Cindy Maciel-Reyes

Sonia Briseño Castellanos

El Paso Independent School District

The Junior League of Austin

Trellis Foundation

The University of Texas Steve Hicks School of Social Work

Best Austin parties for an incredibly artful time

Design, photography and visual art count big in Austin’s social swirl this week.

Nov. 8: Austin Design Week Studio Tour. 4704A E. Cesar Chavez St.

Nov. 9: Pop Austin VIP Opening Night Party. Fair Market.

Nov. 9: Struggle for Justice: Four Decades of Civil Rights Photography reception. Briscoe Center for American History.

Nov. 9: A Night in Africa from African Leadership Bridge. Springdale Station.

Nov. 9: First Light: Preview Party for Creek Show. 708 E. Fifth St.

Nov. 9: Beat the Odds Benefit Concert with Pat Green. Stubbs.

Nov. 9 Due East Native Wildflower Dinner. Big Medium.

Nov. 9-12: Austin International Drag Festival. Various venues.

Nov. 10: ArtBash from Austin Alliance Austin. Native Hostel.

Nov. 10: Veteran’s Show from Austin Visual Arts Association. Austin ArtSpace.

Nov. 10: University of Texas Distinguished Alumnus Awards. UT Alumni Center.

Nov. 11-12: East Austin Studio Tour. Various venues.

Nov. 11: Patriots Ball. Georgetown Sheraton Hotel.

Nov. 12: Umlauf Presents Bernstein 100 Austin. Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum.

Nov. 12: Seton Development Board Gala salutes Luci Baines Johnson. Fairmont Austin.

 

Best parties for this rapturous Austin weather

What could go better with this glorious late October weather than unfettered socializing with fellow Austinites?

Oct. 26-Nov. 3: Austin Film Festival. Various locations.

Oct. 26: Fall Fundraiser for Pease Park Conservancy. Ella Hotel.

Oct. 26: Future Luncheon for Austin Ed Fund. Fairmont Hotel.

Oct. 26: Amazon in Austin for Rainforest Partnership. 800 Congress Ave.

Oct. 27: Tito’s Prize Winner Zack Ingram show reception. Big Medium Gallery.

Oct. 27: Women of Distinction Awards Luncheon for TAMACC. Four Seasons Hotel.

Oct. 28: Spooktacular. Bullock Texas State History Museum.

Oct. 28: Bulltober Fest. Rodeo Austin HQ, 9100 Decker Lake Road.

Oct. 28: Viva La Vida for Day of the Dead. Mexic-Arte Museum.

Oct. 28: Eye Ball for Rude Mechs. Springdale Station.

Oct. 28: Austin Central Library Grand Opening. 710 West Cesar Chavez St.

Oct. 28: Zach Costume Bash. Bobbi Pavilion.

Oct. 28: Austin Sunshine Camps Carnival. Zilker Lodge & Pavilion.

Oct. 28: Barbecue on the Pedernales for Friends of the LBJ National Historical Park. LBJ Ranch

Oct. 29: All ATX for HAAM, SIMS, Black Fret and Austin Music Foundation. Auditorium Shores.

Oct. 29: Empty Bowls Project. Dripping Springs Ranch Park and Event Center.

Oct. 30: Andy Roddick Foundation Gala. ACL Live.

 

Pairing the Ballet Austin Fête with the Thinkery’s Imaginarium

Well, it finally happened.

The JW Marriott Hotel, which combines acres of social space with pretty high-quality hospitality, hosted two big, beloved galas on separate floors on the same night. It really was a treat for a social columnist to move effortlessly between these events by way of a long, gliding escalator.

Ilios and Mandarin work their magic at the Ballet Austin Fete. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

The Ballet Austin gala is really two events: Fête and Fêt-ish. The first is a more traditional benefit featuring a cocktail hour, leisurely dinner, standard program and a lively auction. The second, intended for a younger social set, is more of a dance party enclosed by vibrant animated projections, a VIP nook and the kinds of things you’d find at a high-end nightclub.

Ann Marie and Paul Michael Bloodgood at Ballet Austin Fete. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

In one of the most anticipated social reveals of the season, the walls part and the two parties join for compounded merrymaking. If you stayed for the whole shebang, it would have been a six-hour hullabaloo.

Ana and Carlos Poullet at Ballet Austin’s Fet-ish. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

Two creative teams — Ilios Lighting Design and Mandarin Design Lab — lend these ballet events a singular, enveloping look, this year themed to the company’s first show of the season, “Romeo and Juliet.”

At my table, I enjoyed excellent company, including some sharp Texas lobbyists, early in the evening. Yet I was drawn downstairs to sample the Imaginarium that benefits the Thinkery. The entryway for this youth-skewed gala was just right — one felt pulled into a world of infinite science.

Entering the Imaginarium. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

Given that the Imaginarium first took flight at an open-side airplane hangar near its eventual home at the Mueller Development, finding the event in a well-decorated but otherwise ordinary banquet hall was a little disconcerting. I listened to several speakers and met some cool folks before heading back upstairs.

Patricia Brown and Rich Segal at the Imaginarium for the Thinkery. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

How’s this for making it work? Heath Hale Auctions called both events! The always polite and charming gang of whooping men in cowboy hats raised record sums of money for these two incredibly valuable Austin nonprofits.

Best parties as Austin’s social season gains momentum

Nobody said it would be socially quiet this time of year in Austin.

Sept. 21-24: “Belonging: Part 1” from Blue Lapis Light. Seaholm District Plaza.

Sept. 21-28: Tribeza Style Week. Stateside Theater and Fair Market.

Sept. 21: Hunger Heroes for Central Texas Food Bank. 6500 Metropolis Dr.

Sept. 21: Storm Large and Le Bonheur. UT McCullough Theatre.

Sept. 21: Dreams of the Old West for Dream Come True Foundation. 5211 Brodie Lane.

Sept. 21: Janet St. Paul Studio grand opening, “Vibrations Françaises.” 110 San Antonio St.

Sept. 22-23: Rhythm Runway Show and Jewel Ball for Women’s Symphony League. Various locations.

Sept. 22-24: Texas Tribune Festival. University of Texas campus.

Sept. 22: Fête and Fêt-ish for Ballet Austin. JW Marriott.

Sept. 22: Harvey Can’t Mess with Texas: A Beneift Concert for Hurricane Harvey Relief. Erwin Center.

Sept. 22: Imaginarium for the Thinkery. JW Marriott.

Sept. 22: Rescheduled Studio 54klift for Forklife Dancworks. 5540 N. Lamar Blvd.

Sept. 23: Burnet Road Block Party for Texas Folklife. 5434 Burnet Road.

Sept. 23. The Arc’s Art Celebration for Arc of the Capital Area. Hyatt Regency Austin.

Sept. 23: Quartet of Stars for Travis County Democratic Party. Westin Hotel at the Domain.

Sept. 23-24: Pecan Street Festival. East Sixth Street.

 

 

 

Paying homage to the Big Give and Texas 4000 Tribute Gala

Just about every Austin nonprofit of a certain size fields a young leaders group or stages a giving event geared for young backers. Few feel as authentic or as lively as the Big Give from I Live Here I Give Here.

New neon at the Big Give. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

Credit Executive Director Celeste Flores, but also her excellent party team, who put the focus this year squarely on the Patsy Woods Martin Big Giver, Brittany Morrison, of Hospice Austin. Her speech hit every right note about personal investment in a specific charity. (We promise to interview her soon.)

Additionally, the K Friese +Associates Small Nonprofit Award went to Big Medium and the RetailMeNot Nonprofit Award was taken home by Partners in Parenting.

Roxanne Schroeder-Arce and Erica Saenz at the Big Give. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

I had an ideal time at the Hotel Van ZandtChatted for a long time with two people I know and admire, Erica Saenz and Roxanne Schroeder-Arce; spoke briefly with a dozen other guests; ate three small, salty snacks; and drank one signature cocktail. Never waited in line. Never endured long distractions. Ninety minutes max. The best.

TEXAS 4000 TRIBUTE GALA

While Hurricane Harvey bore down on Texas, several Austin nonprofits chose to forge ahead with their galas. When I heard that the Texas 4000 Tribute Gala that benefits the cancer fight was not canceled, I responded “I guess if you’ve biked 4,000 miles from Texas to Alaska, a little hurricane is not going to stop you.”

Luckily, the happy warriors at the dinner sent me this report, lightly edited:

Jeff Conley, Riddhi Patodia, Krishna Patel, Alex Shrode, Zack Kingsak, Chris Hamborsky, Mikaela Casas, Audrey Nguyen, Nina Lemieux, Amar Sheth, Catherine Butschi and Cienna Taylor at Texas 4000 Tribute Gala. Contributed

“Despite the wind and rain, Texas 4000 for Cancer had its most successful Tribute Gala to date. The funds raised at the JW Marriott, along with what was raised by the riders throughout the year, resulted in over $1 million in fundraising in 2017.

“Suppoerters were determined to not let Hurricane Harvey affect the evening, and one board member even drove round trip from Houston on Friday morning to ensure his auction items made it to the event.

“The 70 riders who biked from Austin to Alaska in the effort to fight cancer were celebrated by the 550 Tribute Gala guests, comprised of alumni, families and supporters.

“Videos portraying the 70-day summer ride reflected the many emotions the riders’ experienced, and shared some of the stories for why they ride.

“The 2017 Texas 4000 riders celebrated throughout the evening as they became Texas 4000 alumni, and the organization inspired others to help put the 15th Texas 4000 team on the road next summer.”